Does the next move for Adobe make Windows irrelevant?

The Apollo project, a core part of Adobe's strategy is all bout creating a foundation upon which developers can create a new generation of applications that can run on any device with a screen and are independent of any particular operating system, something that could lessen the importance Microsoft's Windows.



Adobe: GoLive and Freehand development will continue

With the acquisition of Macromedia’s products, many people expected Adobe to cut its own Web authoring tool, GoLive, in favor of further developing Dreamweaver. Adobe did not dispute the importance of Dreamweaver for the future of the company’s products.

An Adobe representative says “Adobe plans to continue to support GoLive and Freehand and develop these products based on our customer’s needs.”

Adobe pre-releases AJAX framework to ease programming

Adobe pre-released an AJAX library called Spry, to make programming easier for Web designers.

The library is developed at Adobe Labs, the pre-release features data capabilities to incorporate XML into HTML documents using technologies such as HTML, Cascading Style Sheets, and a minimal amount of JavaScript.

Apollo: Flash to go beyond the browser

According to, Adobe is working on client-based software that will run Flash applications separately from a browser, whether online or offline. The company is working on a project code-named Apollo, which will let applications written for Adobe's Flash presentation software run without a Web browser.

New Flash player and update on handling active content

Adobe has released a new Flash Player and a workaround for interactive Flash movies that are affected because of the most recent Eolas patch that Microsoft was forced to implement in the latest version of Internet Explorer.

Flash Reader for mobiles
In a recent interview Shantanu Narayen told Reuters Adobe expects to see increasing revenues from the sale of its main products for use on mobile phones, its president and chief operating officer said on Thursday.
After Acquiring Macromedia, what's Next for Adobe?

Knowledge@Wharton has got a great interview with CEO Bruce Chizen from Adobe.

The interviewer spoke with Bruce Chizen about the details of the Macromedia acquisition, Adobe's plans for integrating Macromedia's technology to develop the next-generation application platform, and his views on the challenges presented by Microsoft.

Adobe states the importance of the designer and developer community

Following the acquisition of Macromedia, Adobe is increasing their efforts to create community outreach programs to continuously improve their relationship with designers and developers across the world.

Flex 2.0 Beta 1

Adobe/Macromedia has got some interesting videos on the recently released Flex 2.0 Beta 1.

Adobe Flex 2.0 delivers an integrated set of tools and technology enabling developers to build and deploy scalable rich Internet Applications. Flex provides a modern, standards-based language supporting common design patterns and includes a client runtime, programming model, development environment, and advanced data services.


Adobe offers further details on Intel plans

Adobe has confirmed that Creative Suite applications will, in the future, be compatible with the Intel-based Macs. While the company did not give specific release dates, they did offer more details on their newest Mac OS X beta release and its other applications, including those recently purchased from Macromedia.

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